From Word to Kindle: Self Publishing Your Kindle Book with Microsoft Word, or Tips on Designing and Formatting Your Text So Your Ebook Doesn't Look Horrible (Like Everyone Else's)
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From Word to Kindle: Self Publishing Your Kindle Book with Microsoft Word, or Tips on Designing and Formatting Your Text So Your Ebook Doesn't Look Horrible (Like Everyone Else's)

by Aaron Shepard
Kindle Edition: 90 pages
Publisher: Shepard Publications

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****#1 KINDLE (US) BESTSELLER IN PUBLISHING & BOOKS (JUNE 2013)****
*******#1 AMAZON.COM BESTSELLER IN BOOK DESIGN (NOV. 2013)*******
**#1 AMAZON.COM BESTSELLER IN MICROSOFT WORD GUIDES (SEPT. 2013)**
 
**********************CURRENT VERSION: 3.1***********************
 
NOTE: PLEASE VISIT AARON'S PUBLISHING PAGE FOR ANY UPDATES TO THIS BOOK.
 
It's not hard to find instructions for converting from Word to Kindle -- but these instructions are usually less helpful than they could be. Many, for example, proclaim that Word's HTML output requires extensive alteration and cleanup before submission.
 
This advice is misguided. Some who offer it have drawn their conclusions after simply choosing the wrong export option. Others fuss about a moderate amount of excess code, not realizing that it doesn't increase file size enough to matter or that the Kindle ignores it anyway.
 
Other instructions will imply the opposite: that conversion is straightforward and just what you would expect. Supposedly, as long as you start with a properly formatted Word document, you'll wind up with a well-formatted ebook. Well, it doesn't really work that way -- not without a few techniques for tricking or bullying the Kindle into doing what you want.
 
In this book, Aaron Shepard offers his own tips for moving your document from Word to Kindle. You'll see the results for yourself, as Aaron's book is produced with the same techniques described in this and his follow-up books, "Pictures on Kindle" and "HTML Fixes for Kindle."
 
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Aaron Shepard is a foremost proponent of the new business of profitable self publishing, which he has practiced and helped develop since 1998. He is the author of "Aiming at Amazon," "POD for Profit," and "Perfect Pages," as well as two other books on Kindle formatting.

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CONTENTS
 
Beginning
 
1 ~ FIRST STEPS
Working with Word | Document Setup | Text Cleanup
 
2 ~ KINDLE FORMATTING
Special Characters | Font Formatting | Paragraph Styles | Paragraph Spacing | Paragraph Justification | Line Breaking | Page Layout
 
3 ~ SPECIAL ELEMENTS
Other Paragraphs | Lists | Tables | Text Boxes and Sidebars | Footnotes and Endnotes | Pictures
 
4 ~ NAVIGATION
Web Links | Internal Links | Tables of Contents | Menu Items
 
5 ~ FINAL STEPS
HTML Export | Book Covers | Book Data | Submitting and Previewing
 
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SAMPLE
 
On the Kindle, font choice is offered mostly for the sake of the Kindle user, not the publisher. The publisher's control of fonts is spotty at best. On some Kindles, you can't control them at all, and on others, you may wind up with a font entirely different from what you expect.
 
On most newer Kindles, the default font is Georgia, and it's a good choice for digital text -- strong and highly readable. So, I suggest you just make this the primary font in your Word document and leave it at that. (On older Kindles, this choice will be ignored in favor of the default Caecilia.)
 
One thing about Georgia, though, is that it has old-fashioned numerals, which may not work for technical writing. In that case, you might instead use Arial for all or part of your book. On newer Kindles, that will give you either Arial or Helvetica, while on older Kindles, it will be ignored. (When possible, this book uses Arial when possible to show HTML code, Web addresses, and such.)
 
Unfortunately, there are no other fonts available across all newer Kindles, other than the primitive Caecilia. So, there's not much point in venturing beyond Georgia and Arial unless you intend to embed a font -- which is beyond the scope of this book. (Though Amazon claims that Courier or "monospace" is available across all Kindles -- a claim repeated almost everywhere -- text specified as Courier displays on the Paperwhite as Helvetica.)
 

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